Hi, I'm Charlotte and I'm a writer - I believe stories can change the world. www.charlotterosehamlyn.com

blithelyblonde:

Always reblog.

(Source: visualpantheon)

bettercallssaul:

the new season of game of thrones looks so good

(Source: tarantinoforever, via kateordie)

I’m just going to say it, I have a big fat lady crush on Geena Davis (and not just because she’s Thelma, Barbara Maitland and the president of the United States all rolled into one) but because she started the self-titled Institute on Gender in Media. Essentially one day she was watching children’s television with her daughter and said “hold the phone… where are all the female characters?” Most people would feel momentarily miffed, shrug their shoulders and go get a nice big cup of ‘that’s just the way it is’ but not Geena Davis. She decided to do something about it. And for that Geena, we salute you!
Now, here are some super easy ways to balance out your scripts! Dig in!
Too good to not share.

Too good to not share.

Earlier this year I made a short film with a group of local filmmakers for Tropfest on the subject of discrimination but you wouldn’t have seen it on the big night - it didn’t make the finals. After Sunday’s Tropfest screening and the crowning of the controversial winner (see here), I now have some insight into why we didn’t make the cut.

The short, set in the late 1950’s, is a fake propaganda film illustrating the dangers of being ‘Aquarius’:

"Barbara is sadly an Aquarius. She was born an Aquarius and has chosen to continue to have been born an Aquarius to this day."

I wrote the film to illustrate the absurdity of prejudice. I believe discriminating against someone because of the month they were born in is just as absurd as doing it on the basis of their race, gender, sexuality, etc.

"Don’t be Aquarian, be antiquarian!"

The short film stars local Sydney up-and-comers Adam Tuominen (Underbelly Razor, Power Rangers) as the films dramatic host and Susanna Dekker (Italian Spiderman, Danger 5)  as the ‘unfortunate’ Aquarian.

Producer Debbie Steer and I have launched the video on Vimeo for the public to see that there are filmmakers out there offering a different viewpoint to the ones given so much attention at Tropfest. The film was made without any funding, only the support of talented filmmakers like cinematographer Emma Paine, Sound Designer Ines Richter, Composer Simon Hanna and Animator Amy Alexander.

Perhaps this film also serves to answer the question posed by Tropfest host Yumi Stynes on the night, “A lot of Twitter chat has been about the lack of female filmmakers here tonight… Look, if you’re gonna complain, why not go out and make a film yourself ladies?”

Don’t worry Yumi, the ladies are doing it - we’re over on Vimeo. Watch the film now:https://vimeo.com/81372429

The Narrative Breakdown: A Podcast for the weary writer.

Picture this: You’re Dorothy, you’ve just squashed some stripy-socked wench with your house and a hord of munchkin villagers are prompting you to swindle her shoes… while her sister watches from the sidelines. Then this tarted up, flashy charlatan in a bubble tells you to trot your dead-lady shoes down the yellow brick road outta’ there. Easy-peasy Winkie-squeezy, you’re homeward bound! - If only writing was such a cinch!

image

Unfortunately, even the most committed aspiring writer can often find themselves utterly bewildered and confused on their hero’s journey, “Would someone throw me a flippin’ yella’ brick for once?!!!”… Alas, there is no Technicolor™ road towards enlightenment for us and we don’t get a ‘Glinda’ to wake us up when the noxious poppy gas knocks us stone cold.

BUT… Sometimes a gal’ can find friends to help her along the way:

I give you: 'The Narrative Breakdown', my newest addiction. A podcast exploring "the craft of creative writing, screenwriting, playwriting, children’s books, and literary fiction as discussed by Cheryl Klein and James Monohan." 

It’s just what the Wizard ordered, so why not start here with one of my faves:'Beginnings and Inciting Events', oh and did I mention that it’s free?

Now write my pretties, write!

Writer’s block. You could say it’s fatal… or you could say it’s just a crappy  excuse because, quite frankly, the only thing in this world that could actually keep you from being able to write is if a pod of zombie Dolphins grew legs, operated a GPS system using their massive zombie Dolphin brains and tracked you down to chew off both your arms… very, very slowly. Either that or some other equally plausible situation wherein you lose both of your arms. 
What I’m trying to say is, I’ve learnt that there aren’t too many things that can physically keep you from being able to write something BUT there are plenty of reasons that you might find it hard to write something good AND most of the time that reason is you. If you find yourself in the situation where you suddenly can’t pull magic out of your arse, let alone a coherent sentence - it’s not a very nice feeling. What’s the best cure for this? Maybe you just need to write it out… see what I did there.
Why not try these handy hints n’ tips:
1. Write the sh*t version - It really works, if you can’t write it well just write it badly, then at least you’ve written something. You might end up finding you solve some of your problems and worst case scenario: If you write something rubbish then you’ll know how not to write it!
2. Play ‘9 in 9’ - This is a little brainstorming game I made up that I find helps me jump mental hurdles. It’s pretty simple: whatever your problem is (eg. solving a plot point, finding the right words for something, etc) give yourself nine(9) minutes to come up with nine(9) solutions. Usually I find this helps me to stop censoring all my ideas and once I’ve written down all the obvious solutions I find it’s much easier to come up with a clever one.
3. Write something else - Sometimes if you get stuck it’s just easiest to take a breather… but try to keep writing. I know some people find going for a run or taking a shower to be a great way to overcome ‘writer’s block’ but if you’re like me and you’re not that person it’s most probably because practising how to wash yourself doesn’t help you to write better-er. 
…Either that or go read everything ever published by Cyanide and Happiness and sit there hating yourself for not being as clever. http://www.explosm.net/

Writer’s block. You could say it’s fatal… or you could say it’s just a crappy  excuse because, quite frankly, the only thing in this world that could actually keep you from being able to write is if a pod of zombie Dolphins grew legs, operated a GPS system using their massive zombie Dolphin brains and tracked you down to chew off both your arms… very, very slowly. Either that or some other equally plausible situation wherein you lose both of your arms. 

What I’m trying to say is, I’ve learnt that there aren’t too many things that can physically keep you from being able to write something BUT there are plenty of reasons that you might find it hard to write something good AND most of the time that reason is you. If you find yourself in the situation where you suddenly can’t pull magic out of your arse, let alone a coherent sentence - it’s not a very nice feeling. What’s the best cure for this? Maybe you just need to write it out… see what I did there.

Why not try these handy hints n’ tips:

1. Write the sh*t version - It really works, if you can’t write it well just write it badly, then at least you’ve written something. You might end up finding you solve some of your problems and worst case scenario: If you write something rubbish then you’ll know how not to write it!

2. Play ‘9 in 9’ - This is a little brainstorming game I made up that I find helps me jump mental hurdles. It’s pretty simple: whatever your problem is (eg. solving a plot point, finding the right words for something, etc) give yourself nine(9) minutes to come up with nine(9) solutions. Usually I find this helps me to stop censoring all my ideas and once I’ve written down all the obvious solutions I find it’s much easier to come up with a clever one.

3. Write something else - Sometimes if you get stuck it’s just easiest to take a breather… but try to keep writing. I know some people find going for a run or taking a shower to be a great way to overcome ‘writer’s block’ but if you’re like me and you’re not that person it’s most probably because practising how to wash yourself doesn’t help you to write better-er. 

…Either that or go read everything ever published by Cyanide and Happiness and sit there hating yourself for not being as clever. http://www.explosm.net/

Emma Coat's 22 rules to phenomenal storytelling

Here’s one of my favourite inspiration-board-worthy infographics designed by PBJ Publishing. It features writing tip tweets from Pixar’s Emma Coat’s - a master storyboard artist. 

Follow the link for a free hi-res jpg for your cork board! Now that’s going straight to the pewl-room.

John Cleese. Need I say more?

Ok, fine - John Cleese: telling us how to get ourselves into a creative headspace in five easy steps:

1. Space: find a place for yourself that is free from disturbance- EG. The moon. 

2. Time: Set yourself a start and end time, Cleese suggests a 1.5 hours is a good start.

3. Time: Give yourself more time to solve your creative problems- you’re not going to come up with the best and most original ideas straight away. Come back to whatever you’re working on as many times as is needed. AKA give yourself “maximum pondering time”.

4. Confidence: Have the confidence to make mistkaes  mistakes.

5. Humor: LOL your way into the right headset- humour is the quickest way to get our noggins to move from ‘closed’ to ‘open’ mode. Open mode is good.

Enjoy!

I like to watch this TED talk when I feel creatively tormented- so, a couple of times a day. Sometimes I just loop it while I lie in the foetal position, soiled in a pool of my own drool and self-doubt chanting the words “I can’t, I can’t, I can’t”. 

The “Eat, Pray, Love” Author Elizabeth Gilbert gives a great TED talk about what tormented artists can do to keep themselves from placing rocks in their pockets and walking into a lake. It’s a fantastic reminder that creative people (oh, and the whole world around them) are much too hard on themselves and need to lighten up *sheesh*. Now, where did I last leave my Genius…